Characters

Character Personifications (100 points)

In the first week of class, we’ll each sign up to personify a character from Zola’s Germinal or Austen’s Pride and Prejudice. [Here is what you signed up for.] At least 4 times while we are discussing that work, you will post as that character. Share thoughts, photos, knowledge of the historical period, links, etc. Respond to other characters’ posts, in character. Demonstrate that you understand the character you’re playing and have tried to grasp his or her experience in the world, and share that familiarity with your classmates in order to help them grasp it all, too.

Grades will be based on the following factors: 4 posts (you can do more but aren’t required to); demonstration of familiarity with character; some demonstration of familiarity with character’s context (what happens to them in the novel, what their life might have been like at that time, in that historical context, etc.). Be as creative as you like, if you want to post drawings, clips of film, music, paintings found on the internet, photos from the period, links to contextual resources, etc.

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154 thoughts on “Characters”

  1. Sir William: While passing through I have come upon Mr. Darcy, I gave him the superior courtesy of a bow.I complemented Mr. Darcy and his partner on their great dancing skills. Though it seems I may have interrupted them, I meant to pass through the other side of the room but instead happened upon Mr.Darcy. Someone in my position should always complement another gentleman of equal status.

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  2. Sir William: Though I only stayed the week at Hunsford, I am convinced that daughter is comfortable and has settled in nicely. My time has been taken up by Mr. Collins who has devoted his mornings to taking me out into the country.I suspect given my status Mr. Collins may be going out of his way to entertain me. No matter it is his duty to do such especially being a host to a Knighted individual.

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  3. Mrs. Bennett: I would never wish illness on any of my daughters especially Jane, but this time it seems that her being I’ll is beneficial to her finding a husband. Also who does that Mr. Darcy think he is thinking the city is better than the country. The country is just as good if not better.

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  4. I am not sure why my wife wishes for me to put in a good word for Elizabeth to Mr. Bingley. Each of my daughters are fine girls, not one being better than the others. Mr. Bingley will have no problem finding one that he fancy’s I am certain and it is not for us to get in the way in hopes of persuading him towards one in specific.

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  5. Louisa Hurst (Mrs. Hurst):
    To my dismay, my brother has ignored Mr. Darcy’s advice and has asked for Jane’s hand in marriage. I spoke too soon for he has also ignored the advice of his sisters. I am also as shocked to hear that Mr. Darcy plans to propose to Elizabeth. I don’t know what Mr. Darcy see’s in Elizabeth for she has insulted Lady Catherine when she came to visit her in her household. Elizabeth has been nothing but wild and does not act like a true lady respecting her claims of duty. The Bennet’s are something of unique and very different than most families. Although what I have said is true, Jane and my brother and Mr. Darcy and Elizabeth are to be married and I have no say in it. My sister and I will have to tolerate them and their family as best as we can.

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  6. Kitty Bennett.
    People says that I am a bit of a whiner, and also they said that I attend to follow Lydia’s steps. However, I don’t care what people said about me I only care to enjoy life and to my future husband. I kind feel lonely since Lidia left with Mr. Wickham, she was the only one I could share my feeling and my thoughts. But now since Lydia left I been connected more to Elizabeth and Jane. Last time I was talking to my sister Mary about pride and she told me what it meant to her pride. I said to her the following,” observed Mary, who piqued herself upon the solidity of her reflections, “is a very common failing, I believe. By all that I have ever read, I am convinced that it is very common indeed; that human nature is particularly prone to it, and that there are very few of us who do not cherish a feeling of self-complacency on the score of some quality or other, real or imaginary. Vanity and pride are different things, though the words are often used synonymous. A person may be proud without being vain. Pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves, vanity to what we would have others think of us” (chapter 47). Therefore, it was a great talking to Mary but Mary said to me the she was surprise the way I behave now and the I have become more mature.

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  7. Kiddy Bennett
    Sometimes I wondering what people might think about me? Sometimes I feel they think that am immature, arrogant, and dumb. But I don’t blain them because I considered myself to had those qualities when I was around with Lydia. My sister Lydia was a role model for me I always wanted to be around her because she was funny and always make me to smile. But after Lydia’s scandal everything change at home, my mom was worry and y sisters was worried too. I was worried that this would affect me probably no one would like to marry me because of Lydia’s scandal. Mary told me the following, “Unhappy as the event must be for Lydia, we may draw from it this useful lesson: that loss of virtue in a female is irretrievable; that one false step involves her in endless ruin; that her reputation is no less brittle than it is beautiful; and that she cannot be too much guarded in her behavior towards the undeserving of the other sex.” I was surprised what she has told about it but Mary is right about this issue the family is going through.

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  8. Mr. Gardiner: Mr. Darcy entered into a conversation with Mr. Gardiner. Elizabeth could not but be pleased, could not but triumph. It was consoling that he should know that she had some relations for whom there was not need to blush. She listened most attentively to all that passed between them, and gloried in every expression, every sentence of her uncle, which marked his intelligence, his taste, or his good manners.

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  9. Kitty Bennett
    It won’t be hard for me to get married, I believe that if my sister Elizabeth, Jane and Lydia got married could totally get a husband. I love to visit my older sisters, I getting so much connected to Jane and Elizabeth. One day I went to visit Elizabeth at Pemberly such as beautiful place. My sister was super lucky because she found a good man like Darcy. I feel the Pemberly is such as beautiful place I want to stay here I hope I could found a husband here. My only pride would be my ignorance but now I have change because I am more educated and more responsible for my actions. After days pass I finally found so attractive in Pemberly I can’t believe hopefully he feels something for me. I still can’t believe that I found my love in Pemberly I am super happy with my husband in this beautiful place.

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  10. Mrs. Bennet I am more than pleased about the current situation. My dear Lydia is to be married to Wickham. I thought that I was to never see her again, but with this I am to see her again. Thank heavens for this, the Bennet name will no longer be tarnished by this little indiscretion. Finally one of my daughters is married. I was coming to the conclusion that this day would never come. My Lydia has restored my confidence in finding good husbands for the rest of my lovely daughters.

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  11. Mr. Darcy: I certainly shall not ever engage the idea of dancing with a stranger. Despite her handsome features, at a country assembly, it is quite out of the question.

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  12. I happened to be on a casual stroll through Meryton today, when I conveniently came across some very fine specimens. Ripe young women were eager to approach me, obviously due to my presence and reputation as an upstanding officer. Mr. Denny did as he was told, and spoke highly of my acceptance of commission in the corps. Everything was perfect until Darcy showed up, the cretin. Even in the company of such sophistication, the scoundrel managed to behave with such incivility. I even touched my hat in salutation and the man simply stared at me like a fool.

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  13. Mr. Darcy: Elizabeth has betwixt my heart. I fear for this endearment, as we are for different social classes. Her wit and unwavering need to do the honorable thing is enchanting. Yet, I don’t know how to handle sentiments of this sort, so I will proceed by ignoring her.

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  14. Colonel Fitzwilliam:
    During dinner I payed special attention to Elizabeth. After dinner I listened to her play while she mocked my cousin Darcey and his bad behavior at the Meryton Ball. In the foloowing days me and Darcey would visit quite often and eventually Charlotte came to the conclusion that I must be interested in Elizabeth.

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  15. This evening I graciously offered my presence in order to dine in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Phillips. To no one’s surprise the women were fascinated by my entrance. I seated myself between Lydia and Elizabeth Bennet, they were obviously the most fair the room had to offer. While the other bores fiddled with whist, I engaged in a conversation with Elizabeth, whose admiration for me was immeasurable. She bored me with trivial topics until I learned of Darcy’s presence. The cretin. I told her the truth about him and his reputation. How he is disgusted in Hertfordshire, so driven by pride and jealousy. How he stripped me of what was rightfully mine.

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  16. Me and my cousin Darcey would frequently encounter Elizabeth on her walks through the countryside. During a conversation I happened to mention on how Darcey was saying that he had saved a friend from an imprudent marriage. That friend that Darcey was talking about happened to be Bingley and the person he was supposed to marry was Jane. Now because of me, Elizabeth views Darcey as her sisters unhappiness.

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  17. Mrs. Bennet: I can not believe what has happened. I am utterly shocked and in awe of it all. My Lizzy marrying Mr. Darcy. I mean it, she absolutely loathed him, but none of that matters now. She assured me that she loves him and I believe her. I can see it now, Lizzy wrapped in the finest dresses, wearing the finest jewelry, traveling in the most glorious of carriages. Mr. Darcy will be part of our family and the Bennet name will be mentioned with pride. I have never been any more happy in my life then this day.

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  18. Mr. Bennet: I realize that I am detached from my family, though I can’t seem to do anything about it. I have failed as a father in allowing her behavior, which has resulted in leaving with Wickham. I am not the father that my daughters deserve, and I fear that it is too late to give them guidance in their young lives. Yet I do not try and establish any meaningful relationship with them beyond shallow jokes.

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  19. Lady Cathrine de Bourgh: Tonight I have extended an invitation to partake in the pleasure of my company to Mr. Collins and Mrs. Collins’ and their wondering visitors. I am most please to rejoice in Mr. Collins in finding a sensible wife that has accepted his hand. It appears to be quite a fortunate occurrence for Mr. Collins to be welcomed into the Lucas home and Mr. Collins gracious offer to honor their daughter, Charlotte in becoming his wife.
    I was, however; most astonished to learn of his cousin, Miss Elizabeth Bennet had the audacity to refuse him. Such an ill-mannered girl, boasting her opinion without though? Impoverished life becomes her, such a foolishness girl and, second eldest of five sisters! Blame fall to the father; allow the youngest of her sibling to frolicking about the town before the eldest sister marry, disgraceful! Opportunity shall not come easy to penurious Miss Bennet, age concedes her, and deteriorate upbringing condemns her. What a dreadful misfortune it would have become Mr. Collins had she accepted!

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  20. Lady Catherine de Bourgh: I consider myself a charitable governess, as I have grown to know of Miss Bennet she has expressed an interest in music and I was astonished for I myself take such enjoyment and have a natural taste in such delights. Miss Bennet’s she does show promise perhaps she would benefit in our company. How I do take pity on the misfortunate, if only she had the proper grooming.
    However; her father requests she return home. Graciously I contest she continue her visit for another month. Her refusal was unexpected; my benevolence is not to be disregarded? Her family has done her no favor, no matter the urgency. I cannot condemn her for her loyalty to family, but to squander opportunity to accompany me? Have I not been a gracious host? No matter, I wish no ill of her and offer my chariot and again her modesty becomes her for her uncle has sent a chariot for her and offered her his cottage to stay during her journey homeward. I may have underestimated her family’s connections; perhaps our paths will cross again. How I do take pleasure in offering mercy to those less fortunate and reccommended she mention my name and she will surely be taken care of.

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  21. Lady Catherine de Bourgh: Will the dreadful deceits of that thankless stable boy, Mr. Wickham terminate? My dear brother in law the, late Mr. Darcy, showed Mr. Wickham exceeding kindness; as a second son and nearly a brother to my nephew, young Mr. Darcy. Inconceivable that Mr. Wickham’s moral fiber deemed obsolete in the passing of my brother in law, the hypocrisy of it all! My nephew, the young Mr. Darcy, offering a handsome sum to satisfy that infectious disease, Mr. Wickham to vacate.
    Though that scourge with his insatiable tyranny then plotted to wed my innocent naive niece, Georgina, barely fifteen in age! Treachery of him capturing part of the family fortunate, disgracing our family and her blindly held hostage by his charm! Her brother, Mr. Darcy, oliged to such a ransom to cunning Mr. Wickham in exchanging for her and exile from our family.
    Now his unbridled gluttony infringes his deception upon, the youngest of the Bennet sisters. It concerns me greatly that Mr. Darcy, again compensated Mr. Wickham in exchange for an advantageous marriage with Miss Lydia Bennet! What dealing is it of ours if duplicitous Mr. Wickham defiles another and a Bennet at that? Miss Lydia Bennet’s death would have been far more tolerable; my condolences to the Bennet sisters! Blame shall fall upon their father; tarnish of their family continues for they have no connections, no fortune and five senseless daughters who show no promise? .
    Though I can rejoice in knowing Mr. Wickham’s pestilence no longer inflicts us; my magnanimous Mr. Darcy, as honorable as he is regains duty and order in settling this matter.

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  22. Lady Cathrine de Bourgh: Betray to our family’s honor; an engagement offered to such an impecunious girl to dearest nephew?? I loathe the notion; it’s simply improbable! What will become of his reputation; drawn in by that of Miss Elizabeth Bennet? Oh such a plague to the family name! No! No this cannot be so, I am not a women to be trifled with, and I shall journey there at once! I will not concede to this disesteemed engagement! I shall not stand idly by and let this misfortunate scandal transpire. The alarming news I cannot ignore or endure such a travesty, for it is the will of my sister and I; that he was betrothed to my daughter at infancy! I will not tolerate condemnation… this belligerent girl will not prevail, “Fetch my chariot at once!” I must make my discontentment known! I will enlighten Miss Bennet for ignorance; this ill-conceived notion of unity shall dissolve at once! She will be forced to oblige me for I will not allow it and I shall not rest until I am satisfied!!

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  23. Anne de Bourgh:
    I am rather excited to meet with the Bennet’s and discuss the marriage today. However I am very concerned of how they will look at me and how sick I am. Due to my illness I am limited to such activities though I enjoy driving my pony cart and speaking with Charlotte Collins. I do hope this will not affect how they think of me. I hope to be rather acquainted with the family.

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  24. Anne de Bourgh:
    I wish my mother were not so condescending. She talks in such an ill manner, talking about how we are prodigies of music though she knows full well that neither her or I have ever learned music. Just because we come from wealth doesn’t mean she has the right to treat people as though they are beneath her and we are better. She can be quite the embarrassment.

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  25. Anne de Bourgh:
    I am not too fond with the idea of marrying my cousin Colonel Fitzwilliam Darcy. Though I am sure my mother is counting on it just to have me married. I do wish this not be the case. I want to find someone with good merit, I rather do not care of status. I would hope to find someone to love and to marry one day, but with my mother, that might be quite difficult.

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  26. Anne de Bourgh:
    The confrontation with my mother and Elizabeth was quite the sight! I can only imagine what others might think of such a scandal! Though I rather feel sorry for her and the shame it will bring on the family. I understand to such a degree of my mother’s astonishment at the Bennet’s sister’s actions, but does she have the right to take it out on poor Elizabeth? She has no control over what her family has done. I question why I do not ever speak out about such things.

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  27. Lizzie- Romance seems to have such puzzling formalities.Why must women be subjected to listening to the longwinded heavily rehearsed lines of a potential husband? A man’s merit does not come from the strength of his lungs. How must I process my emotions, if I must listen so intently to get their point?Why must men believe every woman flounces around her words to hide her wants and desires? I often get into trouble for my interjection of opinion, because I am a lady.

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Associate Professor of Literature :: Yale-NUS College

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